Society

Easter Sunday means confetti from cascarones

The Cooke clan had a glorious Easter weekend, but Monday morning, our back porch and yard looked like Mardi Gras or a similar celebration had thrown up all over it. It seems that son-in-law Big Bill had brought 200 cascarones to our celebration.

For the uninitiated, cascarones are egg shells filled to the brim with brightly colored confetti. What you do with them is crack them over the heads of your friends and loved ones. As the day wears on, the cracking gets harder and harder and everyone is covered in confetti.

Everyone wants to get Pawpaw because they know that he hates confetti with a passion, but he got a few cracks on everyone himself this year. And the reason he hates confetti is that he gets to clean it off the porch.

The younger boys racked their brains trying to figure out how to “get to” Big Bill’s head because it was so far up. Five-year-old Augie, who comes about up to Big Bill’s knee caps, got him first. He told his uncle very sweetly that he had a secret to tell him. When he bent over to hear the supposed secret, Augie smashed him. Then all the other boys crowded around and smashed him again.

Will tore the seat out of a perfectly good pair of pants climbing over the fence to get to an egg on the hood of The Reporter van before Esten did. The pants were the only casualty, I believe.

This was Baby Reese’s first Easter and he enjoyed everything if he was full—even all of us passing him around all weekend. At two-months-old, he wisely opted for a nap instead of the Smash Down Easter Egg Hunt. I don’t think he would have appreciated a confetti egg on his head, but next year, he can do his own smashing.

—pc—

The Sunrise Service at St. John’s United Methodist Church was well attended even if the sun didn’t make an appearance until about noon. I love these joint services with members from other churches getting together—like the Holy Week luncheons, hosted by First Christian Church this year and the Sunrise Service. Breakfast was served and there were lots of egg casseroles, fruit and breads, plenty for everyone.

I brought this bread that son Kyle said he takes to his office every time they have a get-together. They want him to bring it every time and I think you will enjoy this savory version of pull apart bread. It’s fully loaded, so you wouldn’t want to eat it very often, but it’s a special treat when you do eat it.

Pull Apart Bacon Bread 1 package bacon

1 cup onions, chopped

2 cans “Grands” refrigerator biscuits

1 stick butter, melted

Cook bacon until crisp. Drain, reserving drippings. Crumble bacon and set aside. In the drippings (or vegetable oil if you must) cook onions until tender.

Cut biscuits into fourths and place in a large bowl. Add sauteed onions, bacon and butter. Toss all together until the biscuits are thoroughly coated with everything. Place in 10” tube or bundt pan which has been sprayed with Pam. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until top is browned. Immediately invert onto serving plate.

You can slice it or just “pull it apart” to eat. Some optional ingredients you can add are sliced bell peppers to saute with the onions and a handful of cheese. Kyle says not to put much cheese because it makes it harder to get it out of the pan. You can probably think of other things to add—it would be hard to mess up.

If you want to do some of the preparation before hand, do the bacon and onions and add everything but the biscuits. Place the ingredients in a large microwave bowl and refrigerate overnight. The next morning, microwave the goodies until stirrable (is that a word?) and then add the biscuits and mix well before baking.

billpegcooke@sbcglobal.net


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2010-04-08 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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