Society

Pepper fans get fizz-ical at depot

10-2-4 club pops into Rockdale
By MIKE BROWN
Reporter Editor

From left, Karen Krueger, Patsy Camp and David Camp react with delight as Bill Hall opens his antique Dr. Pepper cooler in the I&GN Historical Depot and shows it’s full of iced down—well, what would you expect? Reporter/Mike Brown From left, Karen Krueger, Patsy Camp and David Camp react with delight as Bill Hall opens his antique Dr. Pepper cooler in the I&GN Historical Depot and shows it’s full of iced down—well, what would you expect? Reporter/Mike Brown A Rockdale banker put a different kind of liquid assets on display Saturday at the I&GN Depot Museum.

Bill Hall, a mega-Dr. Pepper fan, has loaned some of his collection to the depot for a two-month display which kicked off Saturday with a planning meeting of the Dr. Pepper 10- 2-4 Club.

Hall, who resides in Taylor but keeps Dr. Pepper memorabilia in a nearby Rockdale building, along with his Texas Star Bank operation, served as host to the 10-2-4 club’s board of directors.

“This is a planning meeting for our March convention in Waco,” Hall said.

LUNCHEON— The morning and early afternoon featured a luncheon on the Depot porch, served by Rockdale Historical Society volunteers, including Joyce Dalley and Toby Johnson, who are also Rockdale city council members.

Bill Hall (above) and David Bryant (R) drink in the exhibits. Bill Hall (above) and David Bryant (R) drink in the exhibits. City Manager Kelvin Knauf welcomed the group, as did Bert Dockall, depot-museum director.

10-2-4 Club members attended from areas including Waco, San Antonio, Dallas and Houston.

Wilton Lanning, founder of the Waco Dr. Pepper Museum was on hand, as was Jack McKinney, the Waco museum’s executive director.

“Our club has members in 48 states,” Hall said.

The club is headquartered in Dallas.

BIC YCL E— Hall’s items included calenders, an extensive collection of art devoted to the soft drink and a Schwinn Dr. Pepper bicycle.

Newspaper articles profliling Hall’s collection, including one from The Reporter, are part of the display.

And, of course, plenty of iced down Dr. Pepper flowed on Saturday.

Dr. Pepper is a Texas original. It was created in Waco in 1885 by Charles Alderson at the Old Corner Drug Store.

He tried to recreate the smell of the soda fountain, with its fruit and berry fragrances, in a soft drink.

Alderton named the drink after a physician father of a young lady he was courting in Virginia.

The father didn’t care for the compliment but the name took hold.

10-2-4— Several generations ago almost everyone could have answered the question “how did the 10-2-4 Club get its name?

But in 2010, members spend a lot of time explaining.

Dr Walter Eddy of Columbia University in the 1920s studied the metabolism of the human body and attempted to show, scientifi- cally, that a natural drop in energy occurs daily at 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 and 4:30 p.m.

A 65-year-old calendar, complete with ad art, is one of many Dr. Pepper items on display at depot. A 65-year-old calendar, complete with ad art, is one of many Dr. Pepper items on display at depot. He also maintained if persons had something to eat or drink at those times the drop in energy would be avoided.

Dr. Pepper seized on the study and developed one of the most famous, and most enduring, advertising campaigns of all time.

Generations were reminded “Drink a bite to eat at 10, 2 and 4.”

“That’s still the classic image of Dr. Pepper, the bottle with the circle and the 10, 2 and 4,

Hall said.

REACTION— Hall said the Dr. Pepper aficionados were impressed with the depot-museum, which recently won an award for the best historical restoration in Texas.

“We got lots of nice compliments on the depot and on the event itself,” he said.


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2010-11-04 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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