Society

Steering clear of ‘senioritis’

I t’s a new year, and for seniors the countdown to graduation has begun.

For some, it’s an exciting time. For others, a serious case of “senioritis” rears its ugly head. How is your senior feeling right now?

Whether your son or daughter has been accepted by a college, is still waiting for an offer, or plans to work immed iately after high school graduation, spring term of senior year is not the time to succumb to senioritis.

Sure, your senior has worked hard during the last four years. But rather than throwing in the towel, it’s a good time to remind him or her to finish strong.

Future employers and colleges are watching. Some universities may withdraw offers of admission to students who drop college prep classes or begin earning lower grades. It’s the full four years that count, not just the first seven semesters of high school.

If your senior starts slacking, colleges might send a warning letter or add certain stipulations to their admissions offer, such as requiring a specific grade point average during the first year of college.

Taking it easy may feel like the right thing to do. But staying focused and mentally sharp will make the transition from high school senior to college freshman much easier.

So let your teen enjoy senior year; but remember that academics— no mat ter what the f uture holds— should always come first.


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2011-01-13 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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