Commentary

COMMENTS FROM CHERYL

‘Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes’ series offered
Cheryl Walker

I f you are a diabetic or a family member of a diabetic, the upcoming “Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes” classes are for you. The classes are a four-part series to cover the nutritional and medical concerns of diabetics.

The cost of the series is $10 per person payable at the first meeting, but we need you to call or email prior to the classes so handouts will be available. Contact the Extension Office at 254- 697- 7045 or email cewalker@tamu.edu.

The series will start on Monday, Sept. 12 and continue on Sept. 19, Sept. 26 and Oct. 3. Each session addresses different nutritional and medical concerns for diabetics. Mark your calendars to attend each “Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes” series to help you manage your diabetes or understand what is happening with family members with diabetes. The classes will be conducted from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Little River Medical Clinic waiting room at 708 N. Crockett in Cameron. Vicki Moore, RN, BSN-Nursing Supervisor for Little River Medical Clinic will be teaching with Cheryl Walker, County Extension Agent-Family and Consumer Sciences Texas AgriLife Extension Service.

The Milam County Office of Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Little River Medical Clinic are sponsoring the training. If you have questions contact the Milam County Extension Office. NUMBERS ON THE RISE— According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the number of people with diabetes has increased by three million in three years to a new high of 24 million. This means that almost eight percent of people in the U.S. have diabetes. Almost a quarter of people over 65 years old have diabetes.

In addition, 57 million people have pre-diabetes, which means they are at very high risk for developing diabetes.

Are you or someone in your family at risk for type 2 diabetes? Your risk is higher if you are over 45 years of age, especially if you are over your recommended weight.

You are also at higher risk if you are less than 45 years of age and have any one of these risk factors: physically inactive; have close relatives with diabetes; are a member of high-risk ethnic populations such as African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander; have delivered a baby weighing over nine pounds; have high blood pressure, high cholesterol and/or triglycerides, polycystic ovary syndrome, tests indicating your body is not handling glucose well, or a history of vascular disease.

If you think you are at risk, ask your doctor or clinic for a fasting blood glucose test. Then, make sure you understand the results when they come back to you. Ask for a copy and keep that copy somewhere so you can find it and compare future results. If you are told your results indicate you do have pre-diabetes, is there anything you can do to reduce your risk of developing diabetes? The Diabetes Prevention Program showed the answer is “yes.”

By walking 30 minutes daily for five days each week at a moderate speed and losing seven percent of your body weight, 58 percent of the people participating in this study did not develop diabetes.

If you know you have diabetes and you want to learn more about how to make sure you do the best you can by keeping your blood glucose in the range recommended by the American Diabetes Association (70 mg/dL to 130 mg/dL), ask your doctor or clinic for help finding diabetes self-management classes in your community. Doctors and other health care professionals can provide advice and medicines, but the person with diabetes has to manage it every day.

Texas AgriLife Extension Service has two low cost programs that can help you prevent and/or manage type 2 diabetes. One is Cooking Well with Diabetes, a 4-week program, that started in July, this program will help diabetics prepare nutritious meals. The other program is a fourweek low cost diabetes education program starting in September addressing the nutritional and medical concerns, Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes.

Call the Milam County Extension Office (254) 697-7045 to find out about these programs in your community.


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2011-07-28 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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