Commentary

Westbrook-Walker family saga began in England

One of the early settlers from England to Virginia in America in the 1700’s was John Westbrook.

When Georgia began to lure new settlers, Westbrook and his family packed their wagon and moved their family and slaves to Franklin County.

Joh n We stbrook ’s fami ly included seven children. One of the Westbrook sons was named Stephen.

Both John and son Stephen served in the Revolutionary War. When the war ended they used their service grants to purchase more than 2,000 acres. Stephen married twice and had two sets of children.

One son was known as a “slave driver” by his siblings in his younger days.

This could be correct for he grew up among slaves, as his father and grandfather owned a number of them. Another of the Westbrook sons was Ervin, born in 1833 in Green County, Georgia.

He married Rachel Walker in January of 1851.

There was a rumor at the time that Rachel was part or full blood Indian.

Ervin and Rachel had 11 children, four born in Mississippi and Albert, Rachel, Lucy, Mary, and Ervin and Lola in Milam County, Texas.

Rachel was known as an “angel” by many as she also reared several orphans, nieces, nephews and one granddaughter.

She was obeyed by all these children or “else”.

Next week the family saga will continue in thse column with s tories of Westbrooks and Walkers when we learn of their trip from Georgia to Texas, where much more of the story took place.

Research:

• “The Westbrook Connection” by Sharon Sumners, Davis, El Paso,

www.MilamCountyHistoricalCommission.org .

maryjoygraham@yahoo.com


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2012-08-09 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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