Society

Archeology topic for naturalists


From left, Dr. Chris Lintz shows arrowheads to Master Naturalists Katherine Bedich and Sue Taylor. From left, Dr. Chris Lintz shows arrowheads to Master Naturalists Katherine Bedich and Sue Taylor. Members and guests of the El Camino Real Chapter of the Texas Master Naturalist were given an overview of human adaptations in prehistoric Central Texas by Dr. Chris Lintz, archaeologist with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Saturday, in the conference room of Rockdale General Store.

Dr. Lintz, one of the foremost authorities on Texas projectile points, described the progression of point development by very early humans during several eras: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, and Late Prehistoric.

Dr. Lintz talked about in depth the utilization of caches by early Texas inhabitants to store points and prepared blanks in areas where suitable flint sources were not available.

He said several such caches have been discovered in the local area.

Dr. Lintz informed the Master Naturalists about the discovery earlier this year of a hut along the San Antonio River, dating to approximately 1,500 BCE.

This find suggests that primitive South Texans lived in sophisticated communities with permanent structures.

He also talked about the history-changing archaeological Gault site nearby in south Bell County.

“It’s a natural thing to want to discover and dig things up,” Lintz said. However, in the process you’re destroying the context and the fabric of the archaeological sites that help us understand the associations.”

“Many archaeological sites have been ruined for use in research because of indiscriminate rearranging and mixing of sediment and artifacts,” Dr. Lintz said.

Also on hand to share his knowledge of arrowheads and fossils with the Master Naturalist group was local expert William Parker of Rockdale.

Parker had several unique relics to share with the group, the most spectacular of which was a huge bison antiquus fossil skull found in Milam County.


Click here for digital edition
2012-09-13 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


Special Sections


Special Sections
Archive