Commentary

MILAM HISTORY

Nile school had 20 students during first year
Joy Graham

When pioneers began settling Milam County, the children needed a school. These families usually settled close to neighbors to defend their homestead.

Nile School was named for the area a bout f our m iles e ast o f Thorndale. The area was covered in mesquite trees and cactus.

The land was a mix of sandy loam to a clay black land. Most of the families farmed that land. On the north side of the I&GN tracks, families in Nile built a school house.

It sat east of Nile General two story b uilding t hat h oused a store/post office on the first floor and the owner’s living quarters on the second story. Several teachers taught at Nile School until it consolidated with Thorndale.

Iva Lee Clark taught there from 1929 to 1931. She received her certificate in elementary education at San Marcos Academy. Her salary was $75 a month. During her first year the school was provided with desks and brooms. Kathryn Robbins was county School Superintendent at that time. At the end of her first year of teaching, Clark’s daily register listed her recommendations for improvements as a hectograph, maps, a teacher’s desk and chair and books for a library.

Enrollment included 11 girls, Mary Sue Burkhart, Ada Calaway, Eleanor, Mabel Hirt, Hettie and Pearl Kaspar, Lorene Limmer, Maudine Tucker, Roxie Worley and Delta Turner.

The nine boys were: Akard and Weldon Beall, B. D. Calaway, Billy K. and Reginald Galbreath, Durwood Graham, Alfred Limmer, Ervin Kaspar and Emze Weise.

These 20 students were taught reading, writing, arithmetic, English, spelling and drawing. A teacher’s daily register was a 20-page guidebook that included everything a teacher needed, record keeping to provide student enrollment, attendance, subjects taught, progress, and teacher’s educational background.

Isn’t it amazing how we have come so far the past 84 years and learned so much.

The progress we made has brought us to the day of cyberspace, and technology to put man on the moon, communicate by telephone worldwide, reaching out across earth to deal with all nations and all peoples. maryjoygraham@yahoocom


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2013-03-07 digital edition



The burn ban for Milam County has been lifted. Burning is always prohibited in the county's municipalities.


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